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Questions about table salt

I am doing a project on table salt... help!

Try the following link(s).

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Why are table salt crystals of uniform size? If you grow crystals, their size is all over the map, so how is this uniformity achieved commercially? Sieves?
garicao, 10/24/99

Larger crystals are crushed; the cleavage lines are at right angles and the fragments are roughly cubic. Crushing results in a distribution of sizes so the salt is sieved to obtain uniform particle size.

See Scientist/Imagemakers for a picture of table salt crystals magnified 35x. You can see that the sizes of the crystals vary, even after sieving.

Author: Fred Senese senese@antoine.frostburg.edu



General Chemistry Online! Questions about table salt

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Last Revised 02/23/18.URL: http://antoine.frostburg.edu/chem/senese/101/inorganic/faq/salt.shtml