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What is the reaction between hydrogen peroxide and iodide?

How would hydrogen peroxide and iodide ions in acid solution react with ammonium molybdate as a catalyst ?
Trystan Voaden

The reaction is

H2O2(aq) + 3I-(aq) + 2 H+(aq) I3-(aq) + 2 H2O(aq)

The reaction above is often very slow, so a catalyst is usually added. Ammonium molybdate works; so do other transition metal ions. The catalytic action probably involves a free radical mechanism. Hydrogen peroxide can reduce MnO4-, but molybdate isn't a strong enough oxidizing agent to be reduced.

Author: Fred Senese senese@antoine.frostburg.edu



General Chemistry Online! What is the reaction between hydrogen peroxide and iodide?

Copyright © 1997-2010 by Fred Senese
Comments & questions to fsenese@frostburg.edu
Last Revised 08/17/15.URL: http://antoine.frostburg.edu/chem/senese/101/redox/faq/h2o2-iodide-reaction.shtml