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Home :FAQ :Simple compoundsPrint | Comment
Previous Question

Where do I find compound properties on the Web?


As you're probably already discovered, simply typing the name of your compound into a public search engine isn't very productive. Most chemical data is stored in databases that the public engines don't index. You have to go directly to the database service to perform your search. A few of the best database sites are listed below.

Start with ChemFinder if you're looking for the basics (structures, melting points and boiling points, molecular weights, and specific gravities). The ChemFinder compound database contains over 75,000 unique substances collected from 350 sites.

Enter a chemical name, CAS Number, molecular formula, or molecular weight

Start with the NIST Chemistry Webbook for thermodynamic and spectroscopic data. (Beware: the nomenclature used isn't always what a general chemistry student might expect, e. g. the gas phase species like AlOH are indexed as "aluminum hydroxide").

Enter a chemical species name (e.g., methane):

Searching chemical handbooks, commercial databases, and multivolume data compilations in the library is still the most efficient way to find authoritative data. See Gary Wiggins' guide to searching for chemical and physical properties of substances for an overview of literature sources. Links to pages for the leading chemical handbooks are included in the list below.

For more esoteric data, try a search of the Journal of Chemical and Engineering Data and other ACS journals by typing your compound name or property into the box below.


Selected compound property resources

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Author: Fred Senese senese@antoine.frostburg.edu



General Chemistry Online! Where do I find compound properties on the Web?

Copyright © 1997-2010 by Fred Senese
Comments & questions to fsenese@frostburg.edu
Last Revised 02/23/18.URL: http://antoine.frostburg.edu/chem/senese/101/compounds/faq/properties-from-Web.shtml